EMCI Second Quarter 2019 Newsletter

APRIL 2019

Relocation/Placement Program

The Relocation/Placement  Program identifies the most vulnerable school-aged children from Northeastern Nigeria and moves them to safer environments. The program has shaped similar to a foster care for orphans and less privileged. Since 2015, 38 children have been relocated. Several have returned to the Northeast, while others have graduated from the schools/institutions they were placed at.

The month of April was full of more school activities as the schools in the placement program worked diligently to make up for lost time from the previous month due to the electioneering season. On April 10th, Wadi a Senior at St. Piran’s High School came home to prepare to seat for her UTME Examinations (this is the major entrance examination for secondary school students into tertiary institutions in Nigeria). Later in the week, the other schools closed for the end of the 2nd term break; three of the four girls who commute from home traveled back to the village for the three-week break. On April 12th, the four schoolchildren at St. Luke’s and one other girl at St. Piran’s High Schools returned home for their end-of-term break. In the last week of the month, the girls who traveled to the village returned in preparation for school resumption on May 6th.

EMCI School: Yola

This school was started in January 2015 to provide an emergency education option to the thousands of IDP children who were displaced by Boko Haram in Borno and Adamawa states.  Many of the communities have been attacked multiple times since then, and the schoolchildren have not been able to return home. As a result, EMCI Yola has become a mainstay of the community.

The month under review had less activity as the school was on the end-term break which ran from the 5th to the 29th of April. During the break, we had a visit from our Superintendent of the school and a Trustee of EMCI Mrs. Parmata Edward who re-encouraged the staff and appreciated them for their hard work and punctuality. Another positive development during the lull period was that the school staff were registered and digitally captured by the Adamawa State Youth Employment and Social Support Operation (YESSO). Finally, our SSS III  students wrote their WAEC examinations while SSSII and JSS III were scheduled to write theirs in the month of May 2019, immediately after resumption.

Needs expressed by the School Management:

  • Repair of broken desks
  • Repair and uplifting of water borehole which spoiled due to frequent use
  • Power supply for computers and laboratory
  • Test books in respect of each subject taught in school
  • More library-space to assist students in developing a reading culture and in doing their assignments.

EMCI School: Lassa

This school was started in October 2015 to provide an emergency education option to the thousands of schoolchildren who returned to Lassa after they were displaced by Boko Haram in 2014.  Many of the towns around Lassa have since come under attack multiple times. IDPs from 17 of the surrounding communities continue to take refuge in Lassa.

Teachers and students were on end of term break, so there was no academic activity to report. However, four classroom tents have been reconstructed.

Needs expressed by the School Management:

School resumption is scheduled for 6th May 2019, here are some of the utensils requested:

  1. One packet of blue biros and one packet of red biros
  2. A 22 lesson plan notebook
  3. School bell for secondary section.

 

May 2019

Relocation/placement Program

The Relocation/Placement  Program identifies the most vulnerable school-aged children from Northeastern Nigeria and moves them to safer environments. The program has shaped similar to a foster care for orphans and less privileged. Since 2015, 38 children have been relocated. Several have returned to the Northeast, while others have graduated from the schools/institutions they were placed at.

End of 2nd term break ended in the first weekend of May, with the students at St. Piran’s and St. Luke’s High Schools going back on May 4th; the five day-school students resumed on May 6th. The growth and maturity of the latter students is visible as founders, Paul and Rebecca were able to travel overseas for two weeks, fully confident that the house was in good hands. On May 22nd, while the founders were away, Hauwa (one of the older students, presently schooling at American University of Nigeria in Yola) came home for her summer holidays. A few days later, Wadi (an SS3/Grade 12 student) returned for a 2-week break following completion of her high school leaving exams. The home then welcomed Mary (also an AUN student) for her summer holidays. Currently, Mary is a 300 level B.Sc. student of accounting in the School of Business and Entrepreneurship. She was shortly followed by Happy, also an SS3 student, who, like Wadi, came home after she had completed her WAEC/JAMB. Wadi returned to school in the last weekend of May.

EMCI School: Yola

This school was started in January 2015 to provide an emergency education option to the thousands of IDP children who were displaced by Boko Haram in Borno and Adamawa states.  Many of the communities have been attacked multiple times since then, and the schoolchildren have not been able to return home. As a result, EMCI Yola has become a mainstay of the community.

School resumed from end of 2nd term break in the last week of April. All staff and teachers returned to their duty posts without any hitches. In observance of International Children’s Day, the school received a team of N.Y.S.C. personnel attached to Federal Road Safety Commission Sangere, Girie Division, Adamawa State on the 27th of May  The program was titled “Children’s/NYSC Road Safety Club Day” and started at 10:00am. Some of the highlights included:

  • A pep-talk on road signs
  • Child restraint in a vehicle
  • Drama presentation by NYSC Corps Members
  • Health talk on personal hygiene by CRMA Rose Emmanuel

On May 31st, there was a competitive football match between EMCI school and Ghana Experimental School which ended 4-1 in favor of EMCI School.

In terms of academics, SSS III concluded writing their WAEC examination and are awaiting NECO to commence within 2 weeks. SSS II and JSS III were scheduled to write theirs shortly after. 19 Students sat for the WAEC and NECO exams this year. As of the time of this newsletter, there were 197 students at secondary level and 497 pupils at primary level, giving a total of 694. The fluctuation from the previous could be due to subsequent reoccurrence of the insurgencies in the affected areas of Madagali Local Government Area. The last time we reported figures was in March, where we ended the month with 686 students.

Needs expressed by the School Management:

  • Repair of broken classroom desks
  • Power supply for computers and laboratory
  • Reconstruction of library space to instill a reading culture in the students
  • Repair of manual borehole broken by frequent use by the students
  • Construction of additional classroom to accommodate the students. Being exposed to the natural elements over a sustained period of time, the tent-classrooms have worn down, leaving the poles standing without shade. This has forced the school to go back to the previous system of morning and afternoon sessions; primary school pupils are taken in the morning hours, and secondary school students in the afternoon.

EMCI School: Lassa

This school was started in October 2015 to provide an emergency education option to the thousands of schoolchildren who returned to Lassa after they were displaced by Boko Haram in 2014.  Many of the towns around Lassa have since come under attack multiple times. IDPs from 17 of the surrounding communities continue to take refuge in Lassa.

  1. During the month of May, there was an attack on Lassa Town by Boko Haram insurgents. As a result of this, all schooling activities were shut down on May 21st
  2. A strong gust of wind blew the roof off of one of the classrooms, however that classroom has since been re-roofed
  3. As of month’s end, we have 509 pupils in primary school and 85 students in secondary school.

Needs expressed by the School Management:

  • The security guards need torch-lights and rain-boots.

 

JUNE 2019

Relocation/placement Program

The Relocation/Placement  Program identifies the most vulnerable school-aged children from Northeastern Nigeria and moves them to safer environments. The program has shaped similar to a foster care for orphans and less privileged. Since 2015, 38 children have been relocated. Several have returned to the Northeast, while others have graduated from the schools/institutions they were placed at.

The month of June saw the placement schoolchildren return to the house in central Nigeria at various intervals for their mid-term breaks. In addition to the schoolchildren in Jos, the girls from American University of Nigeria, Yola are also around for their summer holidays. The younger ones refer to the older girls as aunties. In mid-June, one of the girls who EMCI was able to send to university in the United States returned for her summer break. She was reunited with her former schoolmates in the AUN girls. While here, she paid a some surprise visits to some of the boarding school students (see photos below). Finally, Jummai a student at St. Luke’s college attended a prefect’s retreat in Akwanga, Nassarawa State from June 18th to 22nd. They were given life lessons as well as training on the effects of drug abuse and social media.

EMCI School: Yola

This school was started in January 2015 to provide an emergency education option to the thousands of IDP children who were displaced by Boko Haram in Borno and Adamawa states.  Many of the communities have been attacked multiple times since then, and the schoolchildren have not been able to return home. As a result, EMCI Yola has become a mainstay of the community.

The staff are doing their best in the academic pursuit of the students both in indoor and outdoor activities; monthly C.A. tests were carried out with. In the month under review UNICEF donated sports kits to the school. These included footballs, netballs, volleyballs, and jerseys. In addition, ten (10) high education note books were among the items donated. JSS III sat for their Junior WAEC examinations, full of high expectations. SSS II were still waiting for their mock exams which is to be administered in the near future. Teachers continue to look forward to a day for a training workshop. This will add more grease to their elbows as the previous workshop was credible to their teaching and professionalism.

EMCI and Youth With a Mission also entered a partnership to train some graduates of EMCI Yola in Entrepreneurship and Mission (Evangelism and Discipleship) for a period of one and a half years. At the moment they are on mission trip to Niger Republic. The founder and co-founder of EMCI paid them a surprise visit in June 2019.

Needs expressed by the School Management:

  • Repair of broken classroom desks
  • Power supply for the computers and laboratory
  • Reconstruction of more library-space to accommodate students’s reading and assignments
  • Construction of more classroom to accommodate full day session to disengage morning and afternoon session as the tent-classrooms are tired after being heated by the sun and tattered by wind, leaving only the poles standing.

EMCI School: Lassa

This school was started in October 2015 to provide an emergency education option to the thousands of schoolchildren who returned to Lassa after they were displaced by Boko Haram in 2014.  Many of the towns around Lassa have since come under attack multiple times. IDPs from 17 of the surrounding communities continue to take refuge in Lassa

Academic activities resumed after the interruption last month. There were also positive developments in terms of infrastructure. The ceiling has been fixed all round the six classrooms in the permanent side. In addition, one and a half facing-boards have been replaced. Furnishing was done as the chairs that were in the tent classroom have been removed and taken to one of the other classrooms. Finally, four tent classrooms that were blown over by wind have been reconstructed.

END OF SECOND QUARTER 2019 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *