EMCI First Quarter 2019 Newsletter

January 2019

Relocation/placement Program

The Relocation/Placement  Program identifies the most vulnerable school-aged children from Northeastern Nigeria and moves them to safer environments. The program has shaped similar to a foster care for orphans and less privileged. Since 2015, 38 children have been relocated. Several have returned to the Northeast, while others have graduated from the schools/institutions they were placed at.

The turn of the new year brought about school resumption for the 12 pupils that have been in the Placement/Relocation Program partner schools in Jos. For the boarding schools: the two girls at St. Pirans High school resumed on January 8th while the four schoolchildren at St. Luke’s High School resumed on the 12th. We also have one Muslim student schooling at the school for Veterinary Studies, Vom (outskirts of Jos city) who stays at the house on his short breaks. He had previously traveled to Chibok for the Christmas Holidays and returned in Mid-January before proceeding to college. For the day school students (commuters), their resumption was on January 7th. Presently, there are six schoolchildren that commute from home; starting this term, we had to re-relocate three who had previously been boarding students at another high school in a town about forty kilometers from Jos. In our placement program, we also have Blessing Bello, who was orphaned by Boko Haram when they attacked EYN headquarters in 2014. Her dad and three younger brothers 16, 14 and 12 were all murdered by the terrorists at a go. She just graduated with a National Diploma in Computer Science from the Federal Polytechnic, Mubi. She joined us to continue developing herself in computer applications at an Institute as well as continued tutoring in English at EYN Jos by an American missionary from Church of the Brethren. We continue to monitor her academic progress with the hope of preparing her for further education within or outside the Country. Our two Chibok Girls who are studying in the special program at American University of Nigeria, Yola resumed in late January with Hauwa leaving a week before Mary. Finally, in light of the upcoming national elections, we accompanied 8 placement children to go and get their Permanent Voter’s Cards on January 4th.

EMCI School: Yola

This school was started in January 2015 to provide an emergency education option to the thousands of IDP children who were displaced by Boko Haram in Borno and Adamawa states.  Many of the communities have been attacked multiple times since then, and the schoolchildren have not been able to return home. As a result, EMCI Yola has become a mainstay of the community.

Resumption of 2nd term 2018/2019 academic session on 14th January 2019 following the Christmas holidays was successful. All hands were on deck with development and progress of the school in classroom and outdoor activities. At the same time, staff of the above school expressed their gratitude for collecting their December salaries.

In the month under view, Mrs. Parmata Edward, a Trustee and Superintendent of the school  visited the school and encouraged the staff to do their work more diligently without fear or fervor. She also reminded them to live up to expectations of the children as role models.

Needs expressed by the School Management:

  1. Electric power  supply to the lab and computer
  2. Uplifting of water taps
  3. Fencing the school premises
  4. Repairing trampoline
  5. Repairs of broken desks
  6. Need for staff identity card
  7. Need for student identity cards and school badges.

EMCI School: Lassa

This school was started in October 2015 to provide an emergency education option to the thousands of schoolchildren who returned to Lassa after they were displaced by Boko Haram in 2014.  Many of the towns around Lassa have since come under attack multiple times. IDPs from 17 of the surrounding communities continue to take refuge in Lassa.

  1. School resumed on 8th January 2019
  2. All teachers reported on 8th January
  3. 135 pupils reported on 8th January 2019 and 52 students in secondary school section reported
  4. Present numbers of pupils in primary section is 448, while in secondary section we have 75 students
  5. Staff and students have started using the new toilet at the permanent site
  6. A British man (Michael O’Malley) did a walk to raise money to build the toilet at EMCI Lassa Permanent Site (see details below).

Needs expressed by the School Management:

  1. Toilets are needed at the old temporary site hosting the Primary section of the school.

Michael O’Malley, on his walk to raise money to build the toilet at EMCI Lassa:

“I chose to walk the Camino as a personal retreat so I went alone instead of in a group.”

A little about the Camino: St James (Jesus’ disciple and son of Zebedee) is believed to have spent time in Spain (also part of the Roman Empire) preaching the Gospel. He returned to Judaea only to be beheaded by the Romans … becoming the first of the disciples to become a martyr. His body was returned to Spain and buried in the northwest in Galicia and the town named Santiago (means St James). Since at least 812 AD the pilgrimage, covering 800km (500miles) starting in France and ending at the coast of Spain (Santiago), has not ceased! People do it for spiritual renewal and so many other reasons. Along “the way” there are hostels to spend the nights after a day of walking. Pilgrims receive a great deal of kindness and respect from inhabitants of the villages they pass through as the walk is arduous.

“I covered 111 kilometres in six days – not bad going I felt, for a 75-year-old.  The hardest part was getting up and starting off again each morning, but the best part was knowing I was doing it for a worthy course. All I had to do was walk. Sincere thanks are due to the generosity of my fellow parishioners in St Peter’s. It is thanks to their efforts that the walk I completed in Spain produced such benefits for young people in North Nigeria. We are all delighted that it is so.”

 

FEBRUARY 2019

Placement/Relocation Program

The Relocation/Placement  Program identifies the most vulnerable school-aged children from Northeastern Nigeria and moves them to safer environments. The program has shaped similar to a foster care for orphans and less privileged. Since 2015, 38 children have been relocated. Several have returned to the Northeast, while others have graduated from the schools/institutions they were placed at.

Following school resumption for the 2nd term in early January the students placed at various schools in Jos continued their academic pursuits. The Nigerian general elections scheduled to take place on February 16th were postponed by a week, with a new date of February 23rd. As a result of this, students (both day and boarding) returned home on the 15th of the month for what turned out to be an extended mid-term break. Schoolchildren with parents residing in a nearby town traveled there to be with their immediate families. Hauwa came from Yola to cast her vote at her polling station in Jos, while Blessing continues to take English language at the EYN Computer Center. Following a generally peaceful electioneering season, the boarding students returned to school as did Hauwa return to AUN, Yola. Currently, there are 16 schoolchildren in the Placement/Relocation program.

EMCI Placement Kids On their February Mid-Term Break

EMCI School: Yola

This school was started in January 2015 to provide an emergency education option to the thousands of IDP children who were displaced by Boko Haram in Borno and Adamawa states.  Many of the communities have been attacked multiple times since then, and the schoolchildren have not been able to return home. As a result, EMCI Yola has become a mainstay of the community.

The month of February has come and gone with the following to offer. There was full commitment of academic pursuits by the teachers to the student without any hitches or grudges. The month of February also was blessed with 30 desks for student use by the ministry of women affairs in collaboration with UNICEF. Teachers and students remounted seven (7) classroom tents blown by rain storm to accommodate the students in a full day of classes where both primary and secondary will come to school in the morning and close in the afternoon accordingly. In the same month, the pupils were happy to receive an additional Grow Right supplement drinks shipment. In summary, school activities both indoors and outdoors have taken shape.

Needs expressed by the School Management:

  • Inadequate desks because most of the ones supplied by VSF are broken (though some could be repaired)
  • Power supply to water taps boreholes and the computers to allow their proper use
  • Construction of library to accommodate the available textbooks and to foster a reading culture in students; some of the textbooks supplied are lying on the floor
  • Uplifting of water tap to channel water to the laboratory.

EMCI School: Lassa

This school was started in October 2015 to provide an emergency education option to the thousands of schoolchildren who returned to Lassa after they were displaced by Boko Haram in 2014.  Many of the towns around Lassa have since come under attack multiple times. IDPs from 17 of the surrounding communities continue to take refuge in Lassa.

  1. PTA Officials held a meeting with teachers on 14th February 2019
  2. Students and pupils went on midterm break from February 19th – 27th
  3. Present total number of both students and pupils is 631
  4. Students and some of the pupils are making improvements in their computer skills

Needs expressed by the School Management:

  1. There are no medical drugs in the school
  2. The watchmen need torch-lights
  3. There is no toilet at the temporary site for both pupils and teachers.

 

MARCH 2019

Placement/Relocation Program

The Relocation/Placement  Program identifies the most vulnerable school-aged children from Northeastern Nigeria and moves them to safer environments. The program has shaped similar to a foster care for orphans and less privileged. Since 2015, 38 children have been relocated. Several have returned to the Northeast, while others have graduated from the schools/institutions they were placed at.

The month of March was characterized by period of interruptions in school days due to the national and state level elections. However, the placement children made sure to go to school even on days when they were not sure if classes would hold. In the last week of March, the schoolchildren started their end of 2nd term examinations. They will vacate for the term break on April 5th. The boarding schoolchildren are also writing their term breaks as they anticipate their own term break. The schools are determined to make up for lost time. Blessing (21) and Helen (16) have taken charge of managing the home economics of the program.

For the past 4 years, we have engaged in a conference call with 4th grade students of Wheatland Elementary High School in Andover Kansans. We call these sessions “Skype Around the World” as they are intended to allow pupils from different geographic regions to interact online. The placement schoolchildren always look forward to this day so they can share their backgrounds and aspirations with students from another country.

SKYPE Around The World with Todd Flory on March 7th – 2019

EMCI School: Yola

This school was started in January 2015 to provide an emergency education option to the thousands of IDP children who were displaced by Boko Haram in Borno and Adamawa states.  Many of the communities have been attacked multiple times since then, and the schoolchildren have not been able to return home. As a result, EMCI Yola has become a mainstay of the community.

In the month of March, the school successfully came to the end of 2nd term concluding it with terminal examinations. The school also received a team of NYSC personnel attached to Federal Road Safety Commission (FRSC) Sangere as a body who present themselves as education development pioneers (see photos below). They came with baskets of advice on education role program and achievement. They ended their message by distributing exercise books and pencils to all pupils, students and the teachers.

At the end of the month, the school had 197 students and 489 pupils for a total of 686.

By the school calendar, the school is expected to vacate for the 2nd term break on the 5th of April 2019. And resumption date for 3rd term will be 29th of April 2019.

Needs expressed by the School Management:

  • Uplifting of water tap
  • Repair of hand borehole
  • Power supply to computers
  • Face lift to our laboratory
  • Staff ID cards
  • Additional uniforms
  • Construction of library
  • Teachers welfare
  • Teacher’s refresher course
  • Fencing of the school compound for security measures
  • Repairs of broken desks.

EMCI School: Lassa

This school was started in October 2015 to provide an emergency education option to the thousands of schoolchildren who returned to Lassa after they were displaced by Boko Haram in 2014.  Many of the towns around Lassa have since come under attack multiple times. IDPs from 17 of the surrounding communities continue to take refuge in Lassa.

  1. Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mele Gadzama visited EMC Lassa on March 12th, 2019. They brought 517 GrowRight supplement drinks for the pupils and students. Shelves for a future library room, as well as reading desks are being constructed in Jos (see photos below)
  2. The toilet in the temporary site has been fenced
  3. School was closed for two days 26th – 27th March due to insecurity
  4. The present number of pupils is 495 while the number of students (Junior Secondary School) is 85, bringing the total student population to 580.

END OF FIRST QUARTER 2019

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